Good Earth Tools donates USB drives to local schools

Employees from Good Earth Tools delivered new USB drives to local schools this week. Crystal City, Jefferson R-7, and St. Pius X High School each received 100 of the USB drives.

R7 School receives USB Drives
Students from Danby Middle School, along with Principal Cindy Holdinghausen (seated, left), received the donation of USB drives from Laura Villmer and Gina Huck (also seated) of Good Earth Tools.

“In a school district that is one-to-one for all students between the ages of kindergarten to 12th grade, having devices like this is huge,” said Jefferson R-7 Superintendent Clint Johnston. “It allows our students to be able to archive different items, different materials that they’re using in their classroom on a daily basis.”

Good Earth Tools, a manufacturing facility in Festus/Crystal City, is dedicated to community outreach. “At Good Earth Tools, we are committed to giving back to our community,” said Vice President Kip Williams. “Our employees live here, their children go to school here, and we want to be able to help out whenever we can.”

Crystal City HS receives USB drives
Crystal City High School Principal Matt Holdinghausen, Good Earth Tools Marketing Coordinator Laura Villmer, Crystal City High School Business Education Teacher and FBLA Sponsor Teresa Meyer, Good Earth Tools Customer Service Representative Joan Radin

More than 150 employees at Good Earth Tools helped contribute to various community outreach efforts in 2017, including a food drive for local food pantries and Christmas gifts for the needy.

The USB drives featured an outdated company logo, and Williams said the company wanted them to go to a worthy cause.

St. Pius receives USB drives
Good Earth Tools Customer Service Representatives Gina Huck (left) and Laura Pettus, and St. Pius X High School Technology Coordinator Kevin Halley

The administrators at the local schools were all appreciative of the donation.

“We have students who are unable to afford some things, so this gives them the opportunity to be as competitive as some of the other students,” said Danby Middle School Principal Cindy Holdinghausen. “I know the students will be using them quite a bit. It will be wonderful to be able to use these.”

 

Good Earth Tools Sales Team Focuses on Growth

Good Earth Tools Sales TeamThe entire Good Earth Tools team congregated recently at a meeting at the company’s headquarters in Crystal City, Mo. The meetings included the sales, engineering, marketing, IT, customer service, and management teams. The salesmen gathered from across the country and around the world to discuss sales strategy and targeted markets. “Wear is absolutely everywhere,” said salesman Matt Olinger, “and Good Earth Tools’ tungsten carbide is the best solution for wear.” The sales team discussed potential new markets for Good Earth Tools, collaborated on several new projects, and toured the 27-acre campus, focusing especially on the 130,000 square feet of manufacturing space. “We have a strong engineering group, knowledgeable sales representatives, and the best customer service in the business,” said vice president Kip Williams. “There are a lot of industries out there that have yet to reap the benefits that Good Earth Tools can provide them. Our engineering and sales teams work with our customers, and we create custom solutions with Good Earth Tools tungsten carbide.” The sales team is now back in the field, ready to solve the next wear problem! Got a tough wear problem? Call Good Earth Tools today at 636-937-3330.

Auger Screws Performing Above Expectations

Good Earth Tools recently got the opportunity for a new application of Carbide. A customer was experiencing severe wear problems on their auger screws, replacing them every five to six months due to wear from moving crushed rock. The GET team stepped up to the challenge and, using a silver-solder induction brazing process, applied 8,000 pieces of Carbide to each of two screws. The screws would be tested in their typical extreme environment, with high abrasion and impact. After two months, the GET screws show no signs of wear and are effectively moving the crushed material at the plant at which they were installed. To see how Good Earth Tools can help solve your wear problems, call 636-937-3330 today!

Chasing the Wear

PULVERIZERGood Earth Tools sales engineers are assisting yet another customer as they “chase the wear” on a part. After applying Carbide to the leading edge of all the plow tips in a crusher/grinder, the life of the plows has been extended so much that other parts – without Carbide – are now showing wear. “When we applied Carbide to the high wear areas on the plow tip – wear came to a dead stop!” said Sales Engineer Matt Olinger. “Over time, some wear is shifting to a location on the part that currently does not have Carbide.  Now we can fine-tune the Carbide coverage to stop this wear as well.” The GET team routinely encounters this issue after applying Carbide to a new part, and works closely with the customer to find a solution. This is just one of the many reasons why Good Earth Tools is the leader in solving wear problems. To talk to a Good Earth Tools sales engineer today, call 636-937-3330.

Good Earth Tools to Exhibit at Oil Sands Trade Show

Oil SandsGood Earth Tools sales application engineers will be traveling north for the upcoming Oil Sands Trade Show, September 12-13 at Fort McMurray, Alberta. Fort_mcmurray_aerialThe event is the leading exchange of innovation and opportunity in the Oil Sands Industry. The Good Earth Tools team will be promoting Carbide wear solutions for the industry, especially with oil sands distributors, wear plates, and liners. Stop by Booth #3302 in Hall C and talk with the Good Earth Tools team!

What Is Carbide? Part Two: Toughening Up the Tungsten

In our first installment, we learned why Tungsten Carbide, or Carbide, is ideal for wear solutions. Today, we will learn how it is made.

To produce Cemented Tungsten Carbide, tungsten ore is crushed, heated, and treated with chemicals, then mixed with carbon.

The Carbide grains are sorted by size and mixed with powdered cobalt metal, which acts as a glue to hold the materials together, as well as other materials that improve the wear-resistant properties.

CNow in a powder form, the Carbide is pressed into molds. Once removed from the molds, the product is placed in a sintering furnace and heated in a low-pressure hydrogen atmosphere to 1100-1300 degrees Celsius (2000-2400 degrees F). The cobalt melts, and the molded form shrinks to a solid, smaller size.

Next: Part Three: The Good Earth Tools Difference